Nitrogen, Phosphates and Potassium: The Big 3 Ingredients for a Healthy Lawn

The chemistry of lawn care

At the end of the day, lawn care is like love: it’s all about chemistry!

As your grass leaves grow and root networks develop, nutrients are drawn from the earth and converted into the vital materials that your lawn needs to thrive. This simple chemistry of grass growth is constantly changing the fertility and acidity of your soil, so from time to time you’ll need to add a little nitrogen, phosphorus or potassium to keep things in balance.

Nitrogen / Nitrates

Without nitrogen, plants can’t create chlorophyll, the miracle pigment that makes grass green and enables the whole process of photosynthesis. Nitrogen is one of the most plentiful elements on earth – it makes up more than three quarters of the air we breathe – but plants can only absorb it by drawing nitrates and ammonia from the soil. When your lawn’s nitrate and ammonia levels start to decline, that’s when you’ll start to see signs of nitrogen deprivation in your lawn, such as chlorosis (a condition where your grass can’t produce enough chlorophyll and the grass turns yellow). A nitrogen infusion can transform the look of your lawn, but it must be applied with care, and at the right pace, otherwise you can encourage lawn diseases and burnt foliage. At Lawnkeeper, we use either a fast-release, controlled-release or organic nitrogen treatment, depending on what your lawn needs at any given moment.

Phosphorus / Phosphates

While nitrogen is  important for what happens above the surface of the soil, grass needs phosphorus to build strong root networks underground. The stronger your lawn’s roots, the better – grass with deep roots can withstand typical British drought and frost conditions and can recover from damage quickly. To improve phosphorus levels in your soil, we apply a phosphate treatment, which the grass then absorbs and converts into new growth.

We add phosphorus sparingly to most lawns; it doesn’t wash away as easily as nitrogen or potassium, and established grass doesn’t need much of it to survive. New grass will draw a lot of phosphorus from the soil when it’s taking hold (for instance, after a re-seeding or turfing treatment), but once the new lawn’s root network is established and the initial growth period has drawn to a close, phosphorus levels in the soil remain fairly static – we rarely need to top up. In fact, too much phosphorus can feed algae growth, so we only add phosphates when they’re needed.

Potassium (potash)

Potassium, also known as potash, is a key ingredient for well-fed, healthy grass. Plants use potassium to absorb water from the soil and create the sugars they need to flourish and fight off disease. Heavy rainfall can wash potassium out of your soil, so a regular ‘top-up’ of potash is often worth doing. Potassium needs to be added sparingly — too much of it can destroy the slightly acidic environment your grass needs to grow – so it’s best to get a professional to apply it. 

Want to know more? Get a free lawn analysis!

At Lawnkeeper, our fully trained and certified lawn care technicians are grass experts. We can diagnose the chemical imbalances and deficiencies that might be holding your lawn back from its natural rich green state, and we’ve got a range of treatments to put it right. Give us a call on 0845 0945 363 today and we’ll help you fall in love with your lawn again.

 

Posted by Lawnkeeper News Team in News

Lawn Care & Treatment in Worcester

My name is Andrew Gaut and I operate the Lawnkeeper Worcester area.

We offer high quality lawn care services in Worcester, Malvern, Droitwich, Evesham, Pershore, Upton-upon-Severn, Inkberrow, Wychbold, Ombersley, Broadwas, Colwall and surrounding areas.

We will perform a free comprehensive lawn analysis and discuss with you your lawn’s individual needs to achieve the very best results. We use high quality equipment and products applied by a professional lawn care technician to produce a lawn to be proud of.

As your local Lawnkeeper professional living in Worcester, I take pride in delivering a reliable and friendly customer service. With no two lawns being the same, this includes preparing a detailed, free lawn analysis to ensure you are aware of your lawn’s individual needs. This and the use of high quality, professional products and machinery at the appropriate time of year, will ensure you have a lush green lawn to be proud of.

Lawnkeeper is proud to deliver a quality lawn care service which includes:

  • Feed & weed treatments to provide the nutrients and control weeds for a lush green lawn
  • Aeration to improve surface drainage and promote stronger root growth
  • Scarification to control the build-up of thatch and moss
  • Disease control for a range of lawn diseases, such as red thread, fusarium and dollar spot
  • Growth retardant to reduce mowing frequency and improve root development
  • Hard surface moss and algae control to transform unsightly green and slippery drives, paths and patios
  • Hard surface weed control to combat weed infestation in drives, paths and patios
  • Moss control to prevent the build-up of moss in poorly drained or shaded areas lacking nutrients
  • Pest control to prevent damage to your lawn from pests such as chafer grubs and leatherjackets
  • Wetting agent to help transport water from the soil surface down through the soil profile to the roots where it is needed.

Whatever your lawn requires, Lawnkeeper has the solution.

Posted by Andrew Gaut in Worcester

Fighting the frost: tips to protect a frozen lawn

With temperatures set to drop below zero next week across much of the UK, we look at what you can do to keep your lawn healthy in frozen and frosty conditions.

 

If you wake up to discover a fresh layer of snow or frost on your lawn next week, don’t panic! Mature, well-established grass can endure the freezing temperatures we typically see at this time of year; if you follow a few basic rules, you can make sure your grass makes it through the cold snap with little or no long-term cosmetic damage.

 

Rule 1: Don’t step on it

If your grass freezes over due to frost or snow, the first thing to do is avoid walking on your lawn. Your grass blades are likely frozen and brittle, and a heavy boot can shatter or fracture the plant’s foliage, causing unnecessary long-term damage and inviting disease. If you do need to cross your lawn in the dead of winter, our advice is to wait until midday so that your grass has at least had a chance to thaw.

 

Rule 2: Keep shady patches to a minimum

Just as hot air rises, cold air sinks, and tends to creep slowly along the surface of your lawn until it gets stuck in a hollow or an area with poor air circulation. In shady corners and dips where the cold air can’t escape, one morning’s frost can last for days, and these frost pockets can eventually overwhelm your grass. The best way to avoid frost pockets is to move any unnecessary bulky items off your lawn and away from the verge. If you’ve got a lot of large plant pots or garden furniture on or near the grass, try to move them out of the way for the next few weeks.

 

Rule 3: Protect against sharp winds

Whilst some air circulation is a good thing for your grass, a strong wind can do a lot of damage, especially to a frozen lawn. When it’s frosty, the high wind will cut across the grass, stripping vital moisture from the leaves; if the ground beneath is frozen, your grass won’t be able to replace this lost moisture from its frozen roots, and your lawn will suffer discolouration and damage.  To protect against wind damage, try building a windbreak to take the speed out of the wind before it hits the grass. Hedges or low walls are good long-term solutions, but January is also a great time to set up vegetable planters. You can plant your own onions and beans directly outdoors at this time of year, and the sheer bulk of a few ground-level vegetable troughs will soften even the harshest wind.

 

Rule 4: Work in harmony with the weather

Your grass is at the weakest stage of its natural growth cycle at this time of year, so it’s no surprise that hardy weeds and moss can start to flare up in January. Sometimes, you can remedy this straight away with an immediate lawn care treatment, but if we’re having a cold winter, a poorly-timed lawn care service can actually do more harm than good. At Lawnkeeper, we work in harmony with the weather to make sure that the treatments we do provide in January, whether that’s feed & weed, aeration or moss control, are a help and not a hindrance. It might require a few weeks’ patience, but by working in harmony with the weather, we’ll be able to contribute to the long-term strength of your lawn.

Posted by Lawnkeeper News Team in News

January Jobs for your Garden

With temperatures hovering around 3°C, rain and precious few hours of sunshine, January is a bleak month for the average UK garden. Grass growth is at its slowest and it’s too early for major lawn treatments. That said, there are still a few jobs that you can tackle in January to set yourself up for a fantastic 2019.

DIY January Jobs:

1: Should I mow the lawn?

Whoever does the mowing in your house can look forward to an easy few weeks in January, especially if it’s frosty outside. Mowing frozen grass can cause long-term damage to your lawn, as the grass isn’t strong enough to recover at this time of the year, therefore do not mow the lawn. If you’re itching for something to do, you could always get your mower blades sharpened or take your mower in for a service.

2: Remember to rake away dead leaves

Keep an eye out for leaf debris in January. If you’ve got overhanging trees and hedges that are still shedding leaves over your lawn this month, make sure you rake up the foliage before it has a chance to settle and rot. If fallen leaves are left to sit on the grass, they’ll create the perfect environment for lawn diseases. Fallen leaves also starve your grass of precious winter sunlight.

3: Prune your fruit trees

If you’ve got fruit trees in or near your lawn, January is the perfect time to prune them back. A few hours spent shaping your apple and pear trees over the next few weekends will help the surrounding grass soak up as much precious winter sunlight as possible in February and March, keeping your grass alive and your lawn looking beautiful in the spring and summer months.

4: Feed the birds

January is a tough month for garden birds. If you can, leave hardy fat balls or suet blocks in your bird feeders. The birds will remember which homes they can rely on for food, so a little investment in regular feeding now will keep your garden full of life and noise throughout spring and summer.

Lawnkeeper’s January Jobs:

Driveway & patio moss control

We carry out a lot of hard surface treatments in January. Moss is a major slipping hazard, especially with the long evenings and freezing temperatures common in January, so we often spend our days brightening up our customer’s patios, paths and driveways. If you’ve got a moss problem, just give us a call – we’ll help you get rid of it.

Lawn care treatments to suit the weather

If we’re lucky enough to enjoy a frost-free January, then we’ll be able to carry out lawn treatments like moss control and aeration. The work we do in January is highly weather-dependent; interference with a dormant frozen lawn can cause more problems than it cures, so we’ll let you know what’s possible based on the weather and the underlying health of your grass.

Happy New Year from the Lawnkeeper team

In our professional opinion, you should relax and enjoy the next few weekends as much as you can. There’ll be plenty of opportunities to get out with the lawnmower this year (…especially if you’ve signed up for our quarterly feed and weed treatment!), so put your feet up while you still can!

In the meantime, the Lawnkeeper team would like to wish you a Lush Green 2019! Happy New Year!

Posted by James Cubitt in Airedale News

Hard surface moss control: when to do it and how long it takes

Have you got a slippery moss problem? We’ll show you why January is the perfect month to deal with moss on your driveway, patios and side passages.

January: the perfect month for moss control

If you haven’t already dealt with this year’s build-up of moss on your patio or driveway, then January is the perfect time of year to do so. The early evenings help keep visitors’ attention off any unsightly moss die-back, and by controlling your moss in January you get to welcome spring with clean, bright and safe pavements.

The dangers of patio moss

Few garden mosses pose a health risk until the dead of winter. As temperatures dip, any rainwater held in the spongy structure of driveway moss can freeze over, forming slippery bumps on the pavement around your home. January’s dark evenings make it almost impossible to spot these dangerous icy patches until it’s too late; if you’re not careful, a trip to the recycling bin can land you in hospital.

How to control driveway moss

You can’t kill moss permanently, but you can control it. Moss spores are in the air all around us, and moss will take hold just about anywhere on your property if the conditions are right. While there’s no real way to kill moss forever, it can be controlled with professional products. At Lawnkeeper, we use specific moss control treatments and professional-grade equipment to get the job done. Find out more here.

Hard surface moss treatments

To find out more about the types of hard surface that can be treated, or if you have any questions about how our moss control service works, give us a call – we’re happy to help.

Posted by Lawnkeeper News Team in Moss Control, News

January Jobs for your Garden

With temperatures hovering around 3 – 4°C, some rainfall and precious few hours of sunshine, January is a bleak month for the average UK garden. Grass growth is at its slowest and it’s too early for major lawn treatments. That said, there are still a few jobs that you can tackle in January to set yourself up for a fantastic 2019.

DIY January Jobs:

 

1: Don’t mow the lawn

Whoever does the mowing in your house can look forward to an easy few weeks in January, especially if it’s frosty outside. Mowing frozen grass can cause long-term damage to your lawn, as the grass isn’t strong enough to recover at this time of the year. If you’re itching for something to do, you could always get your mower blades sharpened or take your mower in for a service.

 

2: Rake away dead leaves

Keep an eye out for leaf debris in January. If you’ve got overhanging trees and hedges that are still shedding leaves over your lawn this month, make sure you rake up the foliage before it has a chance to settle and rot. If fallen leaves are left to sit on the grass, they’ll create the perfect environment for lawn diseases like fusarium patch. 

 

3: Prune your fruit trees

If you’ve got fruit trees in or near your lawn, January is the perfect time to prune them back. A few hours spent shaping your apple and pear trees over the next few weekends will help the surrounding grass soak up as much precious winter sunlight as possible in February and March, keeping your grass alive and your lawn looking beautiful in the spring and summer months.

 

4: Feed the birds

January is a tough month for garden birds. If you can, leave hardy fat balls or suet blocks in your bird feeders. The birds will remember which homes they can rely on for food, so a little investment in regular feeding now will keep your garden full of life and noise throughout spring and summer.

 

Lawnkeeper’s January Jobs:

 

Driveway & patio moss control

We carry out a lot of hard surface treatments in January. Moss is a major slipping hazard, especially with the long evenings and freezing temperatures common in January, so we often spend our days brightening up our customer’s patios, side passages and driveways. If you’ve got a moss problem, just give us a call – we’ll help you get rid of it.

 

Lawn care treatments to suit the weather

If we’re lucky enough to enjoy a frost-free January, then we’ll be able to carry out lawn treatments like moss control and aeration. The work we do in January is highly weather-dependent; interference with a dormant frozen lawn can cause more problems than it cures, so we’ll let you know what’s possible based on the weather and the underlying health of your grass.

 

Happy New Year from the Lawnkeeper team

In our professional opinion, you should relax and enjoy the next few weekends as much as you can. There’ll be plenty of opportunities to get out with the lawnmower this year (…especially if you’ve signed up for our quarterly weed and feed treatment!), so put your feet up while you still can!

 

In the meantime, the Lawnkeeper team would like to wish you a Lush Green 2019! Happy New Year!

Posted by Lawnkeeper News Team in News

December 2018 Newsletter

There is no doubt that 2018 has been a very tough year for lawns with The Beast From The East, followed by a washout spring and then the hottest summer on record! Whilst the vast majority of lawns have now largely recovered, those with underlying issues such as areas of shallow/poor soil may need to be repaired in the spring.

If you are in the Aylesbury, Tring, Berkhamsted or Hemel Hempstead areas and would like a free lawn analysis, please give us a call on 01296 821861 / 07773 779235 or email: n.gamble@lawnkeeper.co.uk

Read our December 2018 Newsletter

Posted by Nigel Gamble in Aylesbury, Aylesbury News